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Barguzin Valley, just east of Lake Baikal. Geologically and scenically this valley resembles Wyoming's Jackson Hole, though it is at least twice as long. Photographer Boyd Norton was the first American to visit and photograph this valley when Russia opened up to travelers in 1990. Lake Baikal is the oldest (25 million years), deepest (5700 feet) and largest lake in the world by volume(it holds 20% of the earth's liquid fresh water). Threatened by pollution and most recently by an oil pipeline, Baikal has become a rallying point for Russian and international conservationists. Baikal was declared a World Heritage Site in 1996. Boyd Norton, the photographer here, worked with Russian and U.S. environmentalists to get Baikal designated a World Heritage Site.
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© Boyd Norton all rights reserved
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Lake Baikal, Siberia
Barguzin Valley, just east of Lake Baikal. Geologically and scenically this valley resembles Wyoming's Jackson Hole, though it is at least twice as long. Photographer Boyd Norton was the first American to visit and photograph this valley when Russia opened up to travelers in 1990. Lake Baikal is the oldest (25 million years), deepest (5700 feet) and largest lake in the world by volume(it holds 20% of the earth's liquid fresh water). Threatened by pollution and most recently by an oil pipeline, Baikal has become a rallying point for Russian and international conservationists. Baikal was declared a World Heritage Site in 1996. Boyd Norton, the photographer here, worked with Russian and U.S. environmentalists to get Baikal designated a World Heritage Site.